Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Woolly Worms

The woolly worm (also spelled “wooly worm”) is actually a caterpillar or the larvae of the Isabella Tiger Moth. In some parts of the world, it is believed that the severity of the winter can be predicted by the intensity of the black on the Isabella tiger moth’s larvae (caterpillar). In the American Northeast, it is believed that if the woolly worm has more brown on its body than black, it will be a fair winter. If the woolly worm has more black than brown, the winter will be harsh. Woolly worms may look small, but these dazzling creatures have 13 segments and three sets of legs. They have tiny eyes, but they make their way around mostly by feeling around and touching.
Once the woolly worm has found its home for the winter, it will create a natural organic antifreeze that protects the interior of its cells. Everything else will freeze, but the woolly worm will still survive. The antifreeze protects the creature in freezing temperatures that can dip as low as –90 degrees Fahrenheit. The wooly worm is also protected by shelter. It chooses its places to hide wisely. It crawls under logs, boulders, boards, rocks, and other dark places. The woolly worm will remain in its “frozen” state until May, when it will emerge as a brilliantly colored moth.
 
I've been seeing these guys EVERYWHERE!!! They're really neat...so (for fun) I looked at several real close like; and ta da; going by the folklore we should have a very mild winter! I've seen some ALL BROWN! Haha, right; I don't know about you, but I have a motto "be prepaired", and I'm still going to stock up on everthing!



Gabrielle W.
"The Lord directs the steps of a christian. He delights in every detail of their lives. Though they stumble, they will never fall, for the Lord holds them by the hand." Psalms 37:23-24

No comments:

Post a Comment